Faces Behind the Furniture 1600-1900

Explore BIFMO to discover the people who worked in the British and Irish furniture trades over three hundred years.

 

© British Library Board (D40092-96. Image R,B.23.a.18153, plate opposite 73]

 

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Latest from our blog

British & Irish Furniture Makers Online Conference, 17 Oct 2019

Submitted by Laurie Lindey on Wed, 24/07/2019 - 12:24

We’re holding a conference on the afternoon of the 17th of October in the University of London, followed by a reception, to give our BIFMO audience the opportunity to discover and engage with our online resource and participate in a discussion about future developmental plans. The four-hour conference will include brief presentations from three members of BIFMO staff describing the work they are carrying out.

Women working in the furniture trade in early modern London

Submitted by Laurie Lindey on Wed, 24/07/2019 - 12:07

Early modern London gave birth to opportunities for middle class women to work beyond the domestic sphere. Single women were employed in service industries such as coffee houses and inns, and as shopkeepers, while married women often worked side-by-side in business with their husbands, buying and selling and managing company affairs. In order to work in a skilled occupation or trade in London, however, membership in a City livery company was required. The most common method of gaining this was through apprenticeship or patrimony, both of which were mostly in the reserve of men.